England
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)The Three Lions
AssociationThe Football Association
(The FA)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachVacant
CaptainHarry Kane
Most capsPeter Shilton (125)
Top scorerHarry Kane (66)
Home stadiumWembley Stadium
FIFA codeENG
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 4 Increase 1 (18 July 2024)[1]
Highest3 (August–September 2012, September–October 2021, November 2023[1])
Lowest27 (February 1996[1])
First international
 Scotland 0–0 England 
(Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872)
(The first ever international football match)
Biggest win
 Ireland 0–13 England 
(Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882)
Biggest defeat
 Hungary 7–1 England 
(Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954)
World Cup
Appearances16 (first in 1950)
Best resultChampions (1966)
European Championship
Appearances11 (first in 1968)
Best resultRunners-up (2020, 2024)
Nations League Finals
Appearances1 (first in 2019)
Best resultThird place (2019)
Websiteenglandfootball.com

The England national football team have represented England in international football since the first international match in 1872. It is controlled by the Football Association (FA), the governing body for football in England, which is affiliated with UEFA and comes under the global jurisdiction of world football's governing body FIFA.[3][4] England competes in the three major international tournaments contested by European nations: the FIFA World Cup, the UEFA European Championship and the UEFA Nations League.

England is the joint oldest national team in football having played in the world's first international football match in 1872, against Scotland. England's home ground is Wembley Stadium, London, and its training headquarters is at St George's Park, Burton upon Trent. Gareth Southgate was the most recent manager of the team, stepping down in July 2024 following Euro 2024.[5][6]

England won the 1966 FIFA World Cup final on home soil, making it one of eight nations to have won the World Cup. They have qualified for the World Cup sixteen times, with fourth-place finishes in the 1990 and 2018 editions. England has never won the European Championship, with their best performance to date being runners-up in 2020 and 2024. As a constituent country of the United Kingdom, England is not a member of the International Olympic Committee (as English athletes compete for Great Britain), and so does not compete at the Olympic Games. England is currently the only team to have won the World Cup at senior level but not their major continental title, and the only team representing a non-sovereign country to have won the World Cup.

History

[edit]

Early years

[edit]
The England team before a match against Scotland at Richmond in 1893

The England men's national football team is the joint-oldest in the world; it was formed at the same time as Scotland. A representative match between England and Scotland was played on 5 March 1870, having been organised by the Football Association.[7] A return fixture was organised by representatives of Scottish football teams on 30 November 1872. This match, played at Hamilton Crescent in Scotland, is viewed as the first official international football match, because the two teams were independently selected and operated, rather than being the work of a single football association.[8] Over the next 40 years, England played exclusively with the other three Home Nations—Scotland, Wales and Ireland—in the British Home Championship.

At first, England had no permanent home stadium. They joined FIFA in 1906 and played their first games against countries other than the Home Nations on a tour of Central Europe in 1908.[9] Wembley Stadium was opened in 1923 and became their home ground.[9] The relationship between England and FIFA became strained, and this resulted in their departure from FIFA in 1928, before they rejoined in 1946.[10] As a result, they did not compete in a World Cup until 1950, in which they were beaten in a 1–0 defeat by the United States, failing to get past the first round in one of the most embarrassing defeats in the team's history.[11]

Their first defeat on home soil to a foreign team was a 2–0 loss to Ireland, on 21 September 1949 at Goodison Park.[12] A 6–3 loss in 1953 to Hungary was their second defeat by a foreign team at Wembley.[13] In the return match in Budapest, Hungary won 7–1. This stands as England's largest ever defeat. After the game, a bewildered Syd Owen said, "it was like playing men from outer space".[14] In the 1954 FIFA World Cup, England reached the quarter-finals for the first time, and lost 4–2 to reigning champions Uruguay.[15]

Walter Winterbottom and Alf Ramsey

[edit]
Elizabeth II presenting England captain Bobby Moore with the Jules Rimet trophy following England's 4–2 victory over West Germany in the 1966 World Cup final

Although Walter Winterbottom was appointed as England's first full-time manager in 1946, the team was still picked by a committee until Alf Ramsey took over in 1963.[16][17] The 1966 World Cup was hosted in England and Ramsey guided England to victory with a 4–2 win against West Germany after extra time in the final, during which Geoff Hurst scored a hat-trick.[18] In UEFA Euro 1968, the team reached the semi-finals for the first time, being eliminated by Yugoslavia.[19]

England qualified automatically for the 1970 World Cup in Mexico as reigning champions, and reached the quarter-finals, where they were knocked out by West Germany. England had been 2–0 up, but were eventually beaten 3–2 after extra time.[20] They then failed to qualify for Euro 1972 and the 1974 World Cup, leading to Ramsey's dismissal by the FA.[21]

Don Revie, Ron Greenwood and Bobby Robson

[edit]

Following Ramsey's dismissal, Joe Mercer took immediate temporary charge of England for a seven-match spell until Don Revie was appointed as new permanent manager in 1974.[22] Under Revie, the team underperformed and failed to qualify for either Euro 1976 or the 1978 World Cup.[23] Revie resigned in 1977 and was replaced by Ron Greenwood, under whom performances improved. The team qualified for Euro 1980 without losing any of their games, but exited in the group stage of the final tournament.[24] They also qualified for the 1982 World Cup in Spain; despite not losing a game, they were eliminated at the second group stage.[25][26]

Bobby Robson managed England from 1982 to 1990.[27] Although the team failed to qualify for Euro 1984, they reached the quarter-finals of the 1986 World Cup, losing 2–1 to Argentina in a game made famous by two highly contrasting goals scored by Diego Maradona – the first being blatantly knocked in by his hand, prompting his "Hand of God" remark, the second being an outstandingly skilful individual goal, involving high speed dribbling past several opponents.[28][29] England striker Gary Lineker finished as the tournament's top scorer with six goals.[30]

England went on to lose every match at Euro 1988.[31] They next achieved their second best result in the 1990 World Cup by finishing fourth – losing again to West Germany after a closely contested semi-final finishing 1–1 after extra time, then 3–4 in England's first penalty shoot-out.[32] Despite losing to Italy in the third place play-off, the members of the England team were given bronze medals identical to the Italians'. Due to the team's good performance at the tournament against general expectations, and the emotional nature of the narrow defeat to West Germany,[33] the team were welcomed home as heroes and thousands of people lined the streets for an open-top bus parade.[34]

Graham Taylor, Terry Venables, Glenn Hoddle and Kevin Keegan

[edit]

The 1990s saw four England managers follow Robson, each in the role for a relatively brief period. Graham Taylor was Robson's immediate successor.[35] England failed to win any matches at Euro 1992, drawing with tournament winners Denmark and later with France, before being eliminated by host nation Sweden. The team then failed to qualify for the 1994 World Cup after losing a controversial game against the Netherlands in Rotterdam, which resulted in Taylor's resignation. Taylor faced much newspaper criticism during his tenure for his tactics and team selections.[36]

Between 1994 and 1996, Terry Venables took charge of the team. Hosting Euro 1996, they equalled their best performance at a European Championship, reaching the semi-finals as they did in 1968, before exiting via another penalty shoot-out loss to Germany.[37] England striker Alan Shearer was the tournament's top scorer with five goals.[38] At Euro 96, the song "Three Lions" by Baddiel, Skinner and the Lightning Seeds became the definitive anthem for fans on the terraces,[39] and popularised the chant "it's coming home".[40] Venables announced before the tournament that he would resign at the end of it, following investigations into his personal financial activities and ahead of upcoming court cases. Due to the controversy around him, the FA stressed that he was the coach, not the manager, of the team.[41][42]

Venables' successor, Glenn Hoddle, took the team to the 1998 World Cup — in which England were eliminated in the second round, again by Argentina and again on penalties (after a 2–2 draw).[43] In February 1999, Hoddle was sacked by the FA due to controversial comments he had made about disabled people to a newspaper.[44] Howard Wilkinson took over as caretaker manager for two matches.[45] Kevin Keegan was then appointed as the new permanent manager and took England to Euro 2000, but the team exited in the group stage and he unexpectedly resigned shortly afterwards.[46]

Sven-Göran Eriksson and Steve McClaren

[edit]
The England team at the 2006 FIFA World Cup

Peter Taylor was appointed as caretaker manager for one match, before Sven-Göran Eriksson took charge between 2001 and 2006, and was the team's first non-English manager.[47][48] Although England's players in this era were dubbed a "golden generation" and only lost five competitive matches during Eriksson's tenure,[49] they exited at the quarter-finals of the 2002 World Cup, Euro 2004 and the 2006 World Cup.[50] In January 2006 it was announced that Eriksson would leave the role following that year's World Cup.[51] Steve McClaren was selected to succeed Eriksson, but was sacked on 22 November 2007 after just 18 matches in charge as England failed to qualify for Euro 2008.[52] McClaren was criticised for his team selection in his final game - a decisive qualifier against Croatia which England lost 3-2 - particularly the decision to select inexperienced goalkeeper Scott Carson, whose mistake lead to Croatia's first goal.[53][54]

Fabio Capello, Roy Hodgson and Sam Allardyce

[edit]

On 14 December 2007, Italian manager Fabio Capello was appointed as McClaren's successor, becoming only the second foreign coach to take the job.[55] At the 2010 World Cup, England were considered favourites to top their group[56] but drew their opening two games against the United States and Algeria; this led to questions about the team's spirit, tactics and ability to handle pressure.[57] Despite this, England progressed to the round of 16, where they were beaten 4–1 by Germany, their heaviest defeat in a World Cup finals tournament match.[58] This match became infamous for a ghost goal when Frank Lampard hit a shot from outside the penalty area that bounced down off the crossbar and over the goal line before being cleared by German goalkeeper Manuel Neuer, with neither the referee nor the assistant opting to award a goal. Had it been given, the goal would have tied the game 2–2 with England coming from two goals down. This incident - along with similar mistakes at the tournament - lead to an apology from FIFA president Sepp Blatter and was a factor in the subsequent decision to introduce goal-line technology into football.[59][60] Capello continued as England manager, leading the team's successful qualifying campaign for Euro 2012, before resigning from the role in February 2012 following a disagreement with the FA over their request to remove John Terry from the team captaincy following accusations of racial abuse against the player.[61]

Following Capello's departure, Stuart Pearce was appointed as caretaker manager for one match, after which in May 2012, Roy Hodgson was announced as the new manager, just six weeks before Euro 2012.[62] England managed to finish top of their group, but exited the Championship in the quarter-finals via a penalty shoot-out against Italy.[63] In the 2014 World Cup, England were eliminated at the group stage for the first time since 1958.[64] At Euro 2016, England were eliminated in the round of 16, losing 2–1 to Iceland[65] in a result that has been described as among their worst ever defeats.[66] Hodgson tendered his resignation shortly after the full-time whistle,[67] with Sam Allardyce announced as his successor in July 2016.[68] After one match and only 67 days in charge, Allardyce resigned from his managerial post by mutual agreement following an alleged breach of FA rules. This makes Allardyce the shortest serving permanent England manager.[69]

Gareth Southgate

[edit]
The England line-up before the last match of group G against Belgium, 28 June 2018

After Allardyce's resignation, Gareth Southgate, then the coach of the England under-21 team, was put in temporary charge of the national team until November 2016,[70] before being given the position on a permanent basis at the end of that period.[71] At the 2018 World Cup, England reached the semi-finals for the third time. After finishing second in their group, England faced Colombia in the round of 16 where they won on penalties for the first time at a World Cup, before beating Sweden in the quarter-finals.[72][73][74] In the semi-final, they were beaten 2–1 in extra time by Croatia and finished fourth after losing the third place play-off match against Belgium.[75][76] England striker Harry Kane finished the tournament as top scorer with six goals and was awarded the golden boot.[77]

On 14 November 2019, England played their 1000th international match, defeating Montenegro 7–0 at Wembley in a Euro 2020 qualifying match.[78][79]

England cap awarded to Harry Kane for his appearance against Germany at Euro 2020, his 58th overall

At the delayed Euro 2020, England reached the final of a major tournament for the first time since 1966 and their first ever European Championship final appearance.[80] After finishing top of a group including Croatia, Scotland and Czech Republic, the Three Lions would subsequently defeat Germany, Ukraine and Denmark to advance to the final.[81] In the final held at Wembley, England were defeated by Italy on penalties after a 1–1 draw.[82]

At the 2022 World Cup, England defeated Iran and Wales in the group stage to qualify for the round of 16.[83][84] In the round of 16, the Three Lions defeated Senegal 3–0,[85] but were eliminated by the reigning world champions France in the quarter-finals, 2–1.[86] Harry Kane's goal against France was his 53rd for England, equalling the all-time record at the time.[87] He would later miss an 84th-minute penalty with the chance to level the match.[88]

At Euro 2024, England finished top of their group above Denmark, Slovenia, and Serbia. In the round of 16, England defeated Slovakia 2–1 after extra time, with Jude Bellingham notably scoring a spectacular bicycle kick in second-half stoppage time to equalise the match.[89] In the quarter-final, England beat Switzerland on penalties after the game finished 1–1.[90] England reached their second consecutive European Championship final after defeating the Netherlands 2–1 in the semi-final.[91] In the final, England were defeated 2–1 by Spain, making them the first team in history to lose two consecutive European Championship finals.[92] With three goals, Harry Kane was the joint top scorer at the tournament and shared the golden boot with five other players.[93] Whilst the FA were willing to extend his contract further, Southgate announced his resignation as England manager on 16 July 2024, saying that it was "time for change, and for a new chapter".[94]

Team image

[edit]

Kits and crest

[edit]

Kit suppliers

[edit]
Kit supplier Period Ref
St. Blaize and Hope Brothers 1949–1954 [95][96]
Umbro 1954–1961 [97]
Bukta 1959–1965 [98][99]
Umbro 1965–1974 [99]
Admiral 1974–1984 [99]
Umbro 1984–2013 [100]
Nike 2013–present [101]

Kit deals

[edit]
Kit supplier Period Contract
announcement
Contract
duration
Value
Nike 2013–present 3 September 2012 Spring 2013 – July 2018 (5 years)[102] Total £125m[103]
(£25m per year)
13 December 2016 August 2018 – 2030 (12 years) Total £400m[104]
(£33.3m per year)

Crest

[edit]

The motif of the England national football team has three lions passant guardant, the emblem of King Richard I, who reigned from 1189 to 1199.[105] In 1872, English players wore white jerseys emblazoned with the three lions crest of the Football Association.[106] The lions, often blue, have had minor changes to colour and appearance.[107] Initially topped by a crown, this was removed in 1949 when the FA was given an official coat of arms by the College of Arms; this introduced ten Tudor roses, one for each of the regional branches of the FA.[106][108] Since 2003, England top their logo with a star to recognise their World Cup win in 1966; this was first embroidered onto the left sleeve of the home kit, and a year later was moved to its current position, first on the away shirt.[109]

Colours

[edit]
England shirt for the 1966 World Cup final

England's traditional home colours are white shirts, navy blue shorts and white or black socks. The team has periodically worn an all-white kit.

Although England's first away kits were blue, England's traditional away colours are red shirts, white shorts and red socks. In 1996, England's away kit was changed to grey shirts, shorts and socks. This kit was only worn three times, including against Germany in the semi-final of Euro 1996 but the deviation from the traditional red was unpopular with supporters and the England away kit remained red until 2011, when a navy blue away kit was introduced. The away kit is also sometimes worn during home matches, when a new edition has been released to promote it.

England have occasionally had a third kit. At the 1970 World Cup England wore a third kit with pale blue shirts, shorts and socks against Czechoslovakia. They had a kit similar to Brazil's, with yellow shirts, yellow socks and blue shorts which they wore in the summer of 1973. For the World Cup in 1986 England had a third kit of pale blue, imitating that worn in Mexico 16 years before and England retained pale blue third kits until 1992, but they were rarely used.

Umbro first agreed to manufacture the kit in 1954 and since then has supplied most of the kits, the exceptions being from 1959 to 1965 with Bukta and 1974–1984 with Admiral. Nike purchased Umbro in 2008 and took over as kit supplier in 2013 following their sale of the Umbro brand.[110]

Home stadium

[edit]
Wembley Stadium during a friendly match between England and Germany

For the first 50 years of their existence, England played their home matches all around the country. They initially used cricket grounds before later moving on to football club stadiums. The original Empire Stadium was built in Wembley, London, for the British Empire Exhibition.[111][112]

England played their first match at the stadium in 1924 against Scotland[113] and for the next 27 years Wembley was used as a venue for matches against Scotland only. The stadium later became known simply as Wembley Stadium and it became England's permanent home stadium during the 1950s. In October 2000, the stadium closed its doors, ending with a defeat against Germany.[114]

This stadium was demolished during the period of 2002–03, and work began to completely rebuild it.[115] During this time, England played at venues across the country, though by the time of the 2006 World Cup qualification, this had largely settled down to having Manchester United's Old Trafford stadium as the primary venue, with Newcastle United's St. James' Park used on occasions when Old Trafford was unavailable.[116]

Their first match in the new Wembley Stadium was in March 2007 when they drew with Brazil.[117] The stadium is now owned by the Football Association, via its subsidiary Wembley National Stadium Limited.[118]

Rivalries

[edit]

England's three main rivalries are with Scotland, Germany and Argentina.[119] Smaller rivalries with France, Wales and the Republic of Ireland have also been observed.[120][121][122]

England's rivalry with Scotland is one of the fiercest international rivalries that exists.[123][124] It is the oldest international fixture in the world, first played in 1872 at Hamilton Crescent, Glasgow.[125] The history of the British Isles has led to much rivalry between the nations in many forms, and the social and cultural effects of centuries of antagonism and conflict between the two has contributed to the intense nature of the sporting contests. Scottish nationalism has also been a factor in the Scots' desire to defeat England above all other rivals, with Scottish sports journalists traditionally referring to the English as the "Auld Enemy".[126] The footballing rivalry has diminished somewhat since the late 1970s, particularly since the annual fixture stopped in 1989. For England, games against Germany and Argentina are now considered to be more important than the historic rivalry with Scotland.[127]

England's rivalry with Germany is considered to be mainly an English phenomenon—in the run-up to any competition match between the two teams, many UK newspapers will print articles detailing results of previous encounters, such as England's win in 1966 and the semi-final penalty shoot-out defeats of 1990 and Euro 96.[128][129] This rivalry has diminished significantly in recent years.[130] Germans consider Italy, the Netherlands and France to be their greater rivals, and Barney Ronay of The Guardian wrote in 2021 that the rivalry with England "isn't a close rivalry at all, not if we accept the standard definition that both sides need to be aware that it exists. Germany have won seven major tournaments. Germany have reached 15 semi-finals since the 'one World Cup' of 1966."[131]

England's rivalry with Argentina is highly competitive. Games between the two teams, even those that are only friendly matches, are often marked by notable and sometimes controversial incidents such as the hand of God in 1986.[132][133] The rivalry is unusual in that it is an intercontinental one; typically such footballing rivalries exist between bordering nations. England is regarded in Argentina as one of the major rivals of the national football team, matched only by Brazil and Uruguay.[133] The rivalry is, to a lesser extent reciprocal in England, locally described as a grudge match although matches against Germany carry a greater significance in popular perception. The rivalry emerged across several games during the latter half of the 20th century, even though as of 2008 the teams have played each other on only 14 occasions in full internationals.[134] The rivalry was intensified, particularly in Argentina, by non-footballing events, especially the 1982 Falklands War between Argentina and the United Kingdom.[135] England and Argentina have not met since a friendly in November 2005.[134]

Songs

[edit]

Numerous songs have been released about the England national football team.

Media coverage

[edit]

All England matches are broadcast with full commentary on talkSPORT and BBC Radio 5 Live. From the 2008–09 season until the 2017–18 season, England's home and away qualifiers, and friendlies both home and away were broadcast live on ITV Sport (often with the exception of STV, the ITV franchisee in central and northern Scotland). England's away qualifiers for the 2010 World Cup were shown on Setanta Sports until that company's collapse. As a result of Setanta Sports's demise, England's World Cup qualifier in Ukraine on 10 October 2009 was shown in the United Kingdom on a pay-per-view basis via the internet only. This one-off event was the first time an England game had been screened in such a way. The number of subscribers, paying between £4.99 and £11.99 each, was estimated at between 250,000 and 300,000 and the total number of viewers at around 500,000.[136] In 2018, Sky Sports broadcast the England Nations League and in-season friendlies, until 2021 and ITV Sport broadcast the European Qualifiers for Euro-World Cups and pre-tournament friendlies (after the Nations League group matches end), until 2022.[137] In April 2022, Channel 4 won the rights for England matches until June 2024, including 2022–23 UEFA Nations League matches, Euro 2024 qualifying games, and friendlies. 2022 World Cup rights remained with the BBC and ITV.[138]

Results and fixtures

[edit]

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Loss   Fixture

2023

[edit]
9 September 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying Ukraine  1–1  England Wrocław, Poland
17:00 BST
  • Zinchenko 26'
Report
Stadium: Stadion Wrocław
Attendance: 39,000
Referee: Georgi Kabakov (Bulgaria)
12 September 2023 150th Anniversary Heritage Match Scotland  1–3  England Glasgow, Scotland
19:45 BST
Report
Stadium: Hampden Park
Attendance: 51,000
Referee: Davide Massa (Italy)
13 October 2023 Friendly England  1–0  Australia London, England
19:45 BST
Report Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Attendance: 81,116
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)
17 October 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying England  3–1  Italy London, England
19:45 BST
Report Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Attendance: 83,194
Referee: Clément Turpin (France)
17 November 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying England  2–0  Malta London, England
19:45 GMT (UTC±0)
Report Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Attendance: 81,388
Referee: Luis Godinho (Portugal)
20 November 2023 UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying North Macedonia  1–1  England Skopje, North Macedonia
20:45 CEST (UTC+2)
Report
Stadium: Toše Proeski National Arena
Attendance: 27,982
Referee: Filip Glova (Slovakia)

2024

[edit]
23 March 2024 Friendly England  0–1  Brazil London, England
19:00 GMT (UTC±0) Report
Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Attendance: 83,467
Referee: Artur Soares Dias (Portugal)
26 March 2024 Friendly England  2–2  Belgium London, England
19:45 GMT (UTC±0)
Report
Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Attendance: 80,733
Referee: Sebastian Gishamer (Austria)
3 June 2024 Friendly England  3–0  Bosnia and Herzegovina Newcastle upon Tyne, England
19:45 Report Stadium: St James' Park
Attendance: 50,061
Referee: Rohit Saggi (Norway)
7 June 2024 Friendly England  0–1  Iceland London, England
19:45 Report Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Referee: Davide Massa (Italy)
16 June 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Group C Serbia  0–1  England Gelsenkirchen, Germany
21:00 CEST (UTC+2) Report Stadium: Arena AufSchalke
Attendance: 48,953
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
20 June 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Group C Denmark  1–1  England Frankfurt, Germany
18:00 CEST (UTC+2) Hjulmand 34' Report Kane 18' Stadium: Waldstadion
Attendance: 46,177
Referee: Artur Soares Dias (Portugal)
25 June 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Group C England  0–0  Slovenia Cologne, Germany
21:00 CEST (UTC+2) Report Stadium: RheinEnergieStadion
Attendance: 41,536
Referee: Clément Turpin (France)
30 June 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Round of 16 England  2–1 (a.e.t.)  Slovakia Gelsenkirchen, Germany
18:00 CEST (UTC+2)
Report
Stadium: Arena AufSchalke
Attendance: 47,244
Referee: Halil Umut Meler (Turkey)
6 July 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Quarter-finals England  1–1 (a.e.t.)
(5–3 p)
  Switzerland Düsseldorf, Germany
18:00 CEST (UTC+2)
Report
Stadium: Merkur Spiel-Arena
Attendance: 46,907
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
Penalties
10 July 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Semi-finals Netherlands  1–2  England Dortmund, Germany
21:00 CEST (UTC+2)
Report
Stadium: Westfalenstadion
Attendance: 60,926
Referee: Felix Zwayer (Germany)
14 July 2024 UEFA Euro 2024 Final Spain  2–1  England Berlin, Germany
21:00 CEST (UTC+2) Report
Stadium: Olympiastadion
Attendance: 65,600
Referee: François Letexier (France)
7 September 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 Republic of Ireland  v  England Dublin, Ireland
Stadium: Aviva Stadium
10 September 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 England  v  Finland London, England
Stadium: Wembley Stadium
10 October 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 England  v  Greece London, England
Stadium: Wembley Stadium
13 October 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 Finland  v  England Helsinki, Finland
Stadium: Helsinki Olympic Stadium
14 November 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 Greece  v  England Athens, Greece
Stadium: Agia Sophia Stadium
17 November 2024 2024–25 UEFA Nations League B Group 2 England  v  Republic of Ireland TBD, England

Coaching staff

[edit]
As of 15 March 2023[139][140][141]
Position Name
Manager Vacant[5]
Assistant manager England Steve Holland
Goalkeeping coach Wales Martyn Margetson
Coach Netherlands Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink
Coach England Paul Nevin
First-team doctor England Mark Williams
Head of performance England Steve Kemp
Physical performance coach England Hailu Theodros
England Chris Jones
Nutritionist England Mike Naylor
Head of performance medicine England Charlotte Cowie
Lead performance doctor England Mark Williams
Lead physiotherapist England Simon Spencer
Lead performance analyst England Steve O'Brien
Senior performance analyst England Michael Baker
Head of performance analysis and insight Wales Rhys Long

Players

[edit]

Current squad

[edit]

The following 26 players were named in the final squad for UEFA Euro 2024.[142]

Caps and goals are correct as of 14 July 2024, after the match against Spain.[143][144]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Jordan Pickford (1994-03-07) 7 March 1994 (age 30) 68 0 England Everton
13 1GK Aaron Ramsdale (1998-05-14) 14 May 1998 (age 26) 5 0 England Arsenal
23 1GK Dean Henderson (1997-03-12) 12 March 1997 (age 27) 1 0 England Crystal Palace

2 2DF Kyle Walker (1990-05-28) 28 May 1990 (age 34) 90 1 England Manchester City
3 2DF Luke Shaw (1995-07-12) 12 July 1995 (age 29) 34 3 England Manchester United
5 2DF John Stones (1994-05-28) 28 May 1994 (age 30) 79 3 England Manchester City
6 2DF Marc Guéhi (2000-07-13) 13 July 2000 (age 24) 17 0 England Crystal Palace
12 2DF Kieran Trippier (1990-09-19) 19 September 1990 (age 33) 54 1 England Newcastle United
14 2DF Ezri Konsa (1997-10-23) 23 October 1997 (age 26) 7 0 England Aston Villa
15 2DF Lewis Dunk (1991-11-21) 21 November 1991 (age 32) 6 0 England Brighton & Hove Albion
22 2DF Joe Gomez (1997-05-23) 23 May 1997 (age 27) 15 0 England Liverpool

4 3MF Declan Rice (1999-01-14) 14 January 1999 (age 25) 58 3 England Arsenal
8 3MF Trent Alexander-Arnold (1998-10-07) 7 October 1998 (age 25) 29 3 England Liverpool
10 3MF Jude Bellingham (2003-06-29) 29 June 2003 (age 21) 36 5 Spain Real Madrid
16 3MF Conor Gallagher (2000-02-06) 6 February 2000 (age 24) 18 0 England Chelsea
25 3MF Adam Wharton (2004-02-06) 6 February 2004 (age 20) 1 0 England Crystal Palace
26 3MF Kobbie Mainoo (2005-04-19) 19 April 2005 (age 19) 9 0 England Manchester United

7 4FW Bukayo Saka (2001-09-05) 5 September 2001 (age 22) 40 12 England Arsenal
9 4FW Harry Kane (captain) (1993-07-28) 28 July 1993 (age 30) 98 66 Germany Bayern Munich
11 4FW Phil Foden (2000-05-28) 28 May 2000 (age 24) 41 4 England Manchester City
17 4FW Ivan Toney (1996-03-16) 16 March 1996 (age 28) 6 1 England Brentford
18 4FW Anthony Gordon (2001-02-24) 24 February 2001 (age 23) 4 0 England Newcastle United
19 4FW Ollie Watkins (1995-12-30) 30 December 1995 (age 28) 15 4 England Aston Villa
20 4FW Jarrod Bowen (1996-12-20) 20 December 1996 (age 27) 10 0 England West Ham United
21 4FW Eberechi Eze (1998-06-29) 29 June 1998 (age 26) 7 0 England Crystal Palace
24 4FW Cole Palmer (2002-05-06) 6 May 2002 (age 22) 9 2 England Chelsea

Recent call-ups

[edit]

The following players have also been called up to the England squad within the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK James Trafford (2002-10-10) 10 October 2002 (age 21) 0 0 England Burnley UEFA Euro 2024 PRE
GK Sam Johnstone (1993-03-25) 25 March 1993 (age 31) 4 0 England Crystal Palace v.  Belgium, 26 March 2024 INJ

DF Harry Maguire (1993-03-05) 5 March 1993 (age 31) 63 7 England Manchester United UEFA Euro 2024 PRE INJ
DF Jarrad Branthwaite (2002-06-27) 27 June 2002 (age 22) 1 0 England Everton UEFA Euro 2024 PRE
DF Jarell Quansah (2003-01-29) 29 January 2003 (age 21) 0 0 England Liverpool UEFA Euro 2024 PRE
DF Ben Chilwell (1996-12-21) 21 December 1996 (age 27) 21 1 England Chelsea v.  Belgium, 26 March 2024
DF Rico Lewis (2004-11-28) 28 November 2004 (age 19) 1 0 England Manchester City v.  Belgium, 26 March 2024
DF Fikayo Tomori (1997-12-19) 19 December 1997 (age 26) 5 0 Italy AC Milan v.  North Macedonia, 20 November 2023
DF Levi Colwill (2003-02-26) 26 February 2003 (age 21) 1 0 England Chelsea v.  Malta, 17 November 2023 INJ

MF James Maddison (1996-11-23) 23 November 1996 (age 27) 7 0 England Tottenham Hotspur UEFA Euro 2024 PRE
MF Curtis Jones (2001-01-30) 30 January 2001 (age 23) 0 0 England Liverpool UEFA Euro 2024 PRE
MF Jordan Henderson (vice-captain) (1990-06-17) 17 June 1990 (age 34) 81 3 Netherlands Ajax v.  Belgium, 26 March 2024
MF Kalvin Phillips (1995-12-02) 2 December 1995 (age 28) 31 1 England Manchester City v.  North Macedonia, 20 November 2023

FW Jack Grealish (1995-09-10) 10 September 1995 (age 28) 36 2 England Manchester City UEFA Euro 2024 PRE
FW Marcus Rashford (1997-10-31) 31 October 1997 (age 26) 60 17 England Manchester United v.  Belgium, 26 March 2024
FW Callum Wilson (1992-02-27) 27 February 1992 (age 32) 9 2 England Newcastle United v.  Malta, 17 November 2023 INJ
FW Eddie Nketiah (1999-05-30) 30 May 1999 (age 25) 1 0 England Arsenal v.  Italy, 17 October 2023

INJ Withdrew due to injury
PRE Preliminary squad / standby
RET Retired from the national team
SUS Serving suspension
WD Player withdrew from the squad due to non-injury issue.

Individual records

[edit]

Most appearances

[edit]
As of 14 July 2024.[145]
Goalkeeper Peter Shilton is England's most capped player with 125 appearances.
Rank Player Caps Goals Position Career
1 Peter Shilton 125 0 GK 1970–1990
2 Wayne Rooney 120 53 FW 2003–2018
3 David Beckham 115 17 MF 1996–2009
4 Steven Gerrard 114 21 MF 2000–2014
5 Bobby Moore 108 2 DF 1962–1973
6 Ashley Cole 107 0 DF 2001–2014
7 Bobby Charlton 106 49 MF 1958–1970
Frank Lampard 106 29 MF 1999–2014
9 Billy Wright 105 3 DF 1946–1959
10 Harry Kane 98 66 FW 2015–present

Top goalscorers

[edit]
As of 14 July 2024.[146]
Harry Kane is England's all-time top scorer with 66 goals.
Rank Player Goals Caps Average Career
1 Harry Kane (list) 66 98 0.67 2015–present
2 Wayne Rooney (list) 53 120 0.44 2003–2018
3 Bobby Charlton (list) 49 106 0.46 1958–1970
4 Gary Lineker 48 80 0.60 1984–1992
5 Jimmy Greaves 44 57 0.77 1959–1967
6 Michael Owen 40 89 0.45 1998–2008
7 Nat Lofthouse 30 33 0.91 1950–1958
Alan Shearer 30 63 0.48 1992–2000
Tom Finney 30 76 0.39 1946–1958
10 Vivian Woodward 29 23 1.26 1903–1911
Frank Lampard 29 106 0.27 1999–2014

Most clean sheets

[edit]
As of 14 July 2024.[147]
Rank Player Clean sheets Caps Average Career
1 Peter Shilton 66 125 0.53 1970–1990
2 Joe Hart 43 75 0.57 2008–2017
3 David Seaman 40 75 0.53 1988–2002
4 Gordon Banks 35 73 0.48 1963–1972
5 Jordan Pickford 31 68 0.46 2017–present
6 Ray Clemence 27 61 0.44 1972–1983
7 Chris Woods 26 43 0.60 1985–1993
8 Paul Robinson 24 41 0.59 2003–2007
9 David James 21 53 0.40 1997–2010
10 Nigel Martyn 13 23 0.57 1992–2002

Manager records

[edit]
Most manager appearances
Walter Winterbottom: 139[148]
Highest win ratio (minimum 25 games in charge, including friendlies)
Fabio Capello: 66.7%[149]
Most wins in major tournaments
Gareth Southgate: 14[150]
Youngest to take job
Walter Winterbottom: 33 years old[151][152]
Oldest to take job
Roy Hodgson: 64 years old[153]

Team records

[edit]
Biggest win[a]
13–0 vs. Ireland, 18 February 1882[154]
Biggest defeat
1–7 vs. Hungary, 23 May 1954[155]
Longest unbeaten run
22 games from 18 November 2020 to 29 March 2022[156]
Longest winless run
7 games from 11 May 1958 to 4 October 1958[157]
Most consecutive wins
10 games from 6 June 1908 to 1 June 1909[158]
Most consecutive matches without conceding a goal
7 games from 2 June 2021 to 3 July 2021[159]

Competitive record

[edit]

FIFA World Cup

[edit]
2018 World Cup semi-final: England vs. Croatia
1966 World Cup final lineups: England (red) vs. West Germany

England first appeared at the 1950 FIFA World Cup, and have subsequently qualified for a total of 16 World Cup tournaments, tied for sixth best by number of appearances.[160][161] They are also placed sixth by number of wins, with 32. The national team is one of only eight nations to have won at least one FIFA World Cup title.[162] The England team won their first and only World Cup title in 1966.[163] The tournament was played on home soil, and England defeated West Germany 4–2 in the final.[163] In 1990, England finished in fourth place, losing 2–1 to host nation Italy in the third place play-off, following defeat on penalties, after extra time, to champions West Germany in the semi-final.[164] They also finished in fourth place in 2018, losing 2–0 to Belgium in the third place play-off, following a 2–1 defeat to Croatia, again after extra time, in the semi-final.[165] The team also reached the quarter-final stage in 1954, 1962, 1970, 1986, 2002, 2006 and 2022.[166]

England failed to qualify for the World Cup in 1974, 1978 and 1994.[167] The team's earliest exit in the finals tournament was elimination in the first round in 1950, 1958 and, most recently, 2014.[168][169] This was after being defeated in both their opening two matches for the first time, against Italy and Uruguay in Group D.[169] In 1950, four teams remained after the first round, in 1958 eight teams remained and in 2014 sixteen teams remained. In 2010, England suffered its most resounding World Cup defeat, 4–1 to Germany, in the round of 16 stage.[170]

FIFA World Cup record Qualifying record Manager(s)
Year Round Pos Pld W D[b] L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Not a FIFA member Not a FIFA member None
Kingdom of Italy 1934
French Fourth Republic 1938
Fourth Brazilian Republic 1950 Group stage 8th 3 1 0 2 2 2 Squad 3 3 0 0 14 3 Winterbottom
Switzerland 1954 Quarter-finals 7th 3 1 1 1 8 8 Squad 3 3 0 0 11 4
Sweden 1958 Group stage 11th 4 0 3 1 4 5 Squad 4 3 1 0 15 5
Chile 1962 Quarter-finals 8th 4 1 1 2 5 6 Squad 4 3 1 0 16 2
England 1966 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 11 3 Squad Qualified as hosts Ramsey
Mexico 1970 Quarter-finals 8th 4 2 0 2 4 4 Squad Qualified as defending champions Ramsey
West Germany 1974 Did not qualify 4 1 2 1 3 4
Argentina 1978 6 5 0 1 15 4 Revie
Spain 1982 Second group stage 6th 5 3 2 0 6 1 Squad 8 4 1 3 13 8 Greenwood
Mexico 1986 Quarter-finals 8th 5 2 1 2 7 3 Squad 8 4 4 0 21 2 Robson
Italy 1990 Fourth place 4th 7 3 3 1 8 6 Squad 6 3 3 0 10 0
United States 1994 Did not qualify 10 5 3 2 26 9 Taylor
France 1998 Round of 16 9th 4 2 1 1 7 4 Squad 8 6 1 1 15 2 Hoddle
South Korea Japan 2002[c] Quarter-finals 6th 5 2 2 1 6 3 Squad 8 5 2 1 16 6 Keegan, Wilkinson, Eriksson[d]
Germany 2006 7th 5 3 2 0 6 2 Squad 10 8 1 1 17 5 Eriksson
South Africa 2010 Round of 16 13th 4 1 2 1 3 5 Squad 10 9 0 1 34 6 Capello
Brazil 2014 Group stage 26th 3 0 1 2 2 4 Squad 10 6 4 0 31 4 Hodgson
Russia 2018 Fourth place 4th 7 3 1 3 12 8 Squad 10 8 2 0 18 3 Allardyce, Southgate[e]
Qatar 2022 Quarter-finals 6th 5 3 1 1 13 4 Squad 10 8 2 0 39 3 Southgate
Canada Mexico United States 2026 To be determined To be determined
Morocco Portugal Spain 2030[f]
Saudi Arabia 2034
Total 1 Title 16/22 74 32 22 20 104 68 122 84 27 11 314 70
  Champions    Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place    Hosted tournament
Correct as of 10 December 2022

UEFA European Championship

[edit]
Euro 2020 final lineups: England (white) vs. Italy
Euro 2024 final lineups: England (white) vs. Spain

England first entered the UEFA European Championship in 1964,[172] and have since qualified for eleven tournaments,[172] tied for fourth-best by number of finals appearances. England's best results at the tournament were finishing as runners-up in both the 2020 (held in 2021) and 2024 editions, followed by a third-place finish in 1968[173] and reaching the semi-finals of 1996, a tournament they hosted.[174] In addition, England have reached the quarter-finals on two further occasions, in 2004 and 2012.[173]

England's worst results in the finals tournament to date have been first round eliminations in 1980, 1988, 1992 and 2000, whilst they failed to qualify for the finals in 1964, 1972, 1976, 1984 and 2008.[172]

UEFA European Championship record Qualifying record Manager(s)
Year Round Pos Pld W D[b] L GF GA Squad Pld W D L GF GA
France 1960 Did not enter Did not enter Winterbottom
Francoist Spain 1964 Did not qualify 2 0 1 1 3 6 Winterbottom, Ramsey[g]
Italy 1968 Third place 3rd 2 1 0 1 2 1 Squad 8 6 1 1 18 6 Ramsey
Belgium 1972 Did not qualify[h] 8 5 2 1 16 6 Ramsey
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 Did not qualify 6 3 2 1 11 3 Revie
Italy 1980 Group stage 6th 3 1 1 1 3 3 Squad 8 7 1 0 22 5 Greenwood
France 1984 Did not qualify 8 5 2 1 23 3 Robson
West Germany 1988 Group stage 7th 3 0 0 3 2 7 Squad 6 5 1 0 19 1
Sweden 1992 7th 3 0 2 1 1 2 Squad 6 3 3 0 7 3 Taylor
England 1996 Semi-finals 3rd/4th 5 2 3 0 8 3 Squad Qualified as hosts Venables
Belgium Netherlands 2000 Group stage 11th 3 1 0 2 5 6 Squad 10 4 4 2 16 5 Hoddle, Keegan[i]
Portugal 2004 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 1 1 10 6 Squad 8 6 2 0 14 5 Eriksson
Austria Switzerland 2008 Did not qualify 12 7 2 3 24 7 McClaren
Poland Ukraine 2012 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 2 0 5 3 Squad 8 5 3 0 17 5 Capello, Hodgson[j]
France 2016 Round of 16 12th 4 1 2 1 4 4 Squad 10 10 0 0 31 3 Hodgson
Europe 2020[k] Runners-up 2nd 7 5 2 0 11 2 Squad 8 7 0 1 37 6 Southgate
Germany 2024 Runners-up 2nd 7 3 3 1 8 6 Squad 8 6 2 0 22 4
United Kingdom Republic of Ireland 2028 To be determined To be determined
Italy Turkey 2032
Total Runners-up 11/17 45 18 16 11 59 43 116 79 26 11 270 68
  Champions    Runners-up    Third place/Semi-finalists    Hosted tournament
Correct as of 14 July 2024

UEFA Nations League

[edit]

England have competed in the UEFA Nations League since its inaugural season in 2018–19, when they qualified for the 2019 finals and finished third overall. To date this is their only appearance in the finals and their best performance in the competition.

UEFA Nations League record
League phase[l] Finals Manager(s)
Season Lg Grp Pos Pld W D L GF GA P/R Rnk Year Pos Pld W D[b] L GF GA Squad
2018–19 A 4 1st 4 2 1 1 6 5 Same position 3rd Portugal 2019 3rd 2 0 1 1 1 3 Squad Southgate
2020–21 A 2 3rd 6 3 1 2 7 4 Same position 9th Italy 2021 Did not qualify Southgate
2022–23 A 3 4th 6 0 3 3 4 10 Decrease 15th Netherlands 2023
2024–25 B 2 To be determined 2025
Total 16 5 5 6 17 19 3rd Total 1/4 2 0 1 1 1 3
  Champions    Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place  
Correct as of 8 February 2024

Minor tournaments

[edit]
Year Round Position Pld W D[b] L GF GA Ref.
Brazil 1964 Taça de Nações Group stage 3rd 3 0 1 2 2 7 [175]
United States 1976 USA Bicentennial Cup Tournament Group stage 2nd 3 2 0 1 6 4 [176]
Scotland 1985 Rous Cup One match 2nd 1 0 0 1 0 1 [177]
Mexico 1985 Ciudad de México Cup Tournament Group stage 3rd 2 0 0 2 1 3 [178]
Mexico 1985 Azteca 2000 Tournament Group stage 2nd 2 1 0 1 3 1 [179]
England 1986 Rous Cup Winners, one match 1st 1 1 0 0 2 1 [177]
England Scotland 1987 Rous Cup Group stage 2nd 2 0 2 0 1 1 [177]
England Scotland 1988 Rous Cup Winners, group stage 1st 2 1 1 0 2 1 [177]
England Scotland 1989 Rous Cup Winners, group stage 1st 2 1 1 0 2 0 [177]
England 1991 England Challenge Cup Winners, group stage 1st 2 1 1 0 5 3 [180]
England 1995 Umbro Cup Group stage 2nd 3 1 1 1 6 7 [181]
France 1997 Tournoi de France Winners, group stage 1st 3 2 0 1 3 1 [182]
Morocco 1998 King Hassan II International Cup Tournament Group stage 2nd 2 1 1 0 1 0 [183]
England 2004 FA Summer Tournament Winners, group stage 1st 2 1 1 0 7 2 [184]
Total 6 Titles 33 12 10 11 43 37

Honours

[edit]
Elizabeth II presents the Jules Rimet Trophy to England captain Bobby Moore, after winning the 1966 World Cup.

Major

[edit]

Regional

[edit]

Awards

[edit]

Exhibition tournament

[edit]

Summary

[edit]
Competition 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Total
FIFA World Cup 1 0 0 1
UEFA European Championship 0 2 2 4
UEFA Nations League 0 0 1 1
Total 1 2 3 6

See also

[edit]

Notes

[edit]
  1. ^ England's two largest victories (13–0 away and then 13–2 at home) coincidentally both occurred on 18 February, against Ireland. Four of England's five largest margins of victory occurred away from home. As well as the 13–0 victory, they defeated Austria 11–1 in 1908, Portugal 10–0 in 1947, United States 10–0 in 1964 and San Marino 10–0 in 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d Draws include knockout matches decided by a penalty shoot-out.
  3. ^ England played all of their matches in Japan.
  4. ^ Kevin Keegan and Howard Wilkinson managed one qualifying match each: Sven-Göran Eriksson managed the remaining qualification matches and the finals campaign.
  5. ^ Sam Allardyce managed one qualifying match: Gareth Southgate managed the remaining qualification matches and the finals campaign.
  6. ^ Additional matches are scheduled to be played in Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the first world cup, however they are not considered to be official hosts of the tournament.[171]
  7. ^ England were defeated by France in a two-legged elimination round. Alf Ramsey took over from Walter Winterbottom between the two legs.
  8. ^ Although England did not qualify for the finals, they reached the last eight of the competition. Only the last four teams progressed to the finals.
  9. ^ Glenn Hoddle managed the first three qualifiers, while Kevin Keegan managed the remaining qualification matches and the finals campaign.
  10. ^ Fabio Capello managed the qualification campaign. He resigned before the final tournament and was replaced by Roy Hodgson.
  11. ^ The tournament was held in 11 cities in 11 UEFA countries. London's Wembley Stadium hosted all of England's games except for their quarter-final match which was hosted at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome.
  12. ^ League phase is played home and away. Flag shown represents host nation for the finals.

References

[edit]
  1. ^ a b c "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Men's World Ranking". FIFA. 18 July 2024. Retrieved 18 July 2024.
  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 15 July 2024. Retrieved 15 July 2024.
  3. ^ "FA Handbook 2013–14" (PDF). The Football Association. p. 621. Archived from the original on 19 February 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2014.
  4. ^ "Written evidence submitted by Lord Triesman". Parliament of the United Kingdom. May 2009. Archived from the original on 14 June 2018. Retrieved 31 August 2014.
  5. ^ a b "Southgate resigns after England's Euro 2024 loss". bbc.co.uk. BBC. Retrieved 16 July 2024.
  6. ^ "A message from Gareth Southgate". englandfootball.com. The Football Association. Retrieved 16 July 2024.
  7. ^ "5 March 1870: England v Scotland at The Oval". The Guardian. 13 May 2011. Archived from the original on 16 March 2016. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  8. ^ "England Match No. 1 – Scotland – 30 November 1872 – Match Summary and Report". englandfootballonline.com. Archived from the original on 3 December 2011. Retrieved 22 October 2009.
  9. ^ a b "A history of the FA". The Football Association. Archived from the original on 29 November 2020. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  10. ^ "England disappointed before '66". BBC Sport. 11 April 2002. Archived from the original on 26 June 2021. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  11. ^ Hart, Tim (12 June 2010). "England v USA: 1950 World Cup win over the Three Lions lives long in the memory". The Daily Telegraph. London. Archived from the original on 10 January 2022.
  12. ^ Paul Rouse (20 September 2019). "'Eleven men from Éire upset the white shirts of England'". The Irish Examiner. Archived from the original on 26 June 2021. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  13. ^ Jonathan Wilson (25 November 2013). "England 3–6 Hungary: 60 years on from the game that stunned a nation". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  14. ^ Goodbody, John (22 November 2003). "Football's November revolution: Magnificent Magyars storm England's Wembley fortress". The Times. London. Archived from the original on 29 April 2011. Retrieved 13 February 2011.
  15. ^ "England v Uruguay past-meetings". The Football Association. 18 June 2014. Archived from the original on 26 June 2021. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  16. ^ Brian Glanville (18 February 2002). "Sir Walter Winterbottom". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 26 June 2021. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  17. ^ David Barber (27 February 2015). "Sir Alf's first game in charge: Alf Ramsey first took charge of England on 27 February 1963". The Football Association. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  18. ^ "1966: Football glory for England". BBC Sport 30 July 1996. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  19. ^ "Yugoslavia beat world champions England to reach EURO 1968 final". UEFA. 2 October 2003. Archived from the original on 26 June 2021. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  20. ^ "World Cup quarter-final 1970". BBC Sport. 17 November 2008. Archived from the original on 25 April 2022. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  21. ^ Chris Bevan (14 October 2013). "England v Poland 1973: When Clough's 'clown' stopped England". Archived from the original on 24 October 2018. Retrieved 26 June 2021.
  22. ^ Rob Bagchi (11 October 2012). "The forgotten story of … England under Joe Mercer". The Guardian. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  23. ^ "The Don". BBC. 2 June 2009. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  24. ^ Pye, Steven (9 October 2020). "When England fans ruined their match against Belgium 40 years ago". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 16 May 2021. Retrieved 16 May 2021.
  25. ^ Brian Glanville (10 February 2006). "Ron Greenwood". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 11 July 2021. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  26. ^ Ken Jones (23 October 2011). "Football: England at the World Cup: 1982 Spain – A flying start but a frustrating finish". The Independent. Archived from the original on 27 June 2021. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  27. ^ Jeremy Wilson (31 July 2009). "Sir Bobby Robson: The England years 1982–1990". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 10 January 2022. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  28. ^ "How a defeat to Denmark cost Bobby Robson's England a place at Euro 84". The Guardian. 5 March 2014. Archived from the original on 27 June 2021. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  29. ^ Marcela Mora y Araujo (11 June 2018). "How Diego Maradona redefined football in the space of less than five minutes". CNN. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  30. ^ "Gary Lineker's 1986 World Cup in pictures: "Look at those nut-huggers Barnso is wearing..."". FourFourTwo. 3 June 2014. Archived from the original on 27 June 2021. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  31. ^ Rob Smyth (9 June 2008). "On Second Thoughts: England at Euro 88". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 11 July 2019. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  32. ^ "England v West Germany at Italia '90 – as it happened". The Guardian. 27 March 2014. Archived from the original on 2 April 2019. Retrieved 11 July 2018.
  33. ^ "Gazza's tears – 1990". 11 June 2018. Archived from the original on 11 December 2021 – via YouTube.
  34. ^ Martyn Ziegler (12 July 2018). "No official celebration next week for England's return". The Times. Archived from the original on 17 September 2021. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  35. ^ "Graham Taylor: Ex-England, Watford & Aston Villa manager dies aged 72". BBC Sport. 12 January 2017. Archived from the original on 12 January 2017. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  36. ^ McNulty, Phil (12 January 2017). "Graham Taylor obituary: Ex-England boss a fount of knowledge and a true gentleman". BBC News. Archived from the original on 10 July 2021. Retrieved 10 July 2021.
  37. ^ "Germany beat England on penalties to reach EURO '96 final". UEFA. 6 October 2003. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  38. ^ Mike Gibbons (6 June 2021). "Euro Icons – 1996: Alan Shearer and the summer when football came home". Eurosport. Archived from the original on 7 October 2022. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  39. ^ Rahman-Jones, Imran (2021). "It's coming home: How Three Lions became the definitive England song". BBC News. Archived from the original on 9 July 2021. Retrieved 9 July 2021. "Three lions on a shirt / Jules Rimet still gleaming / Thirty years of hurt / never stopped me dreaming"
  40. ^ Sommerlad, Joe. "It's Coming Home: The history of the England fan chant". The Independent. Retrieved 15 July 2024.
  41. ^ Fifield, Dominic (27 September 2016). "England managers and off-field controversies: from Revie to Hodgson". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 6 July 2018. Retrieved 9 July 2021.
  42. ^ "Venables is also the only England manager ever to resign from his post because of the muddy personal details set to be showcased in a high-profile trial related to financial irregularities." V is for Venables. When Saturday Comes. 3 August 2006. ISBN 9780141927039. Retrieved 10 September 2014.
  43. ^ "#WorldCupAtHome: Argentina frustrate England again". FIFA. 22 April 2020. Archived from the original on 7 October 2022. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  44. ^ "Hoddle sacked". BBC News. 3 February 1999. Archived from the original on 23 April 2022. Retrieved 9 July 2021.
  45. ^ Owen Gibson (10 November 2016). "Howard Wilkinson to advise FA in deciding next England manager". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 September 2022. Retrieved 10 September 2022.
  46. ^ "On this day in 2000: Kevin Keegan resigns as England boss after Germany defeat". FourFourTwo. 7 October 2020. Archived from the original on 10 September 2022. Retrieved 10 September 2022.
  47. ^ Sean Ingle (9 November 2000). "Taylor names Beckham captain of youthful looking England squad". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 September 2022. Retrieved 10 September 2022.
  48. ^ Ron Walker (5 January 2021). "20 years on from the appointment of Sven-Goran Eriksson". Sky Sports. Archived from the original on 10 September 2022. Retrieved 10 September 2022.
  49. ^ Philip O'Connor (6 July 2018). "England would hate to lose to Sweden, says Sven-Goran Eriksson". Reuters. Archived from the original on 10 September 2022. Retrieved 10 September 2022.
  50. ^ Chris Flanagan (16 November 2020). "What happened to England's "Golden Generation"? How the country's most talented squad never came good". FourFourTwo. Archived from the original on 29 October 2023. Retrieved 30 November 2023.
  51. ^ Daniel Taylor (24 January 2006). "Eriksson takes golden handshake to walk away after World Cup". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 September 2022. Retrieved 10 September 2022.
  52. ^ "McClaren sacked as England coach". BBC Sport. 22 November 2007. Archived from the original on 1 August 2017. Retrieved 30 November 2023.
  53. ^ Jonathan Stevenson (21 November 2007). "England 2-3 Croatia". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 22 November 2007. Retrieved 11 July 2024.
  54. ^ David James (25 November 2007). "Don't blame Carson - the real gaffe was exposing him to such high pressure". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 11 July 2024.
  55. ^ "Capello named new England manager". BBC Sport. 14 December 2007. Archived from the original on 20 November 2020. Retrieved 10 September 2022.
  56. ^ "2010 World Cup Group C Preview: England, USA, Algeria, Slovenia". Bleacher Report. 5 June 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2023.
  57. ^ Gibson, Owen (21 June 2010). "Rifts appear as players grow tired of Capello regime". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 31 December 2013. Retrieved 3 July 2010.
  58. ^ Kevin McCarra (27 June 2010). "Germany 4–1 England". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 5 November 2019. Retrieved 10 September 2022.
  59. ^ Marcus, Jeffrey (29 June 2010). "FIFA President Apologizes for Refereeing Errors". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 15 April 2023. Retrieved 11 July 2024.
  60. ^ "Lampard's Ghost Goal and the Video Revolution in the Decade That Followed". 5 May 2020.
  61. ^ "Fabio Capello quits as England manager after meeting with FA". BBC Sport. 8 February 2012. Archived from the original on 29 July 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  62. ^ "Roy Hodgson appointed England manager by FA". BBC Sport. 1 May 2012. Archived from the original on 31 August 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  63. ^ McNulty, Phil (24 June 2012). "England 0–0 Italy (2–4 on pens)". Archived from the original on 8 November 2013. Retrieved 20 November 2013.
  64. ^ "World Cup 2014: England crash out after Costa Rica surprise Italy". The Guardian. 20 June 2014. Archived from the original on 22 June 2014. Retrieved 20 June 2014.
  65. ^ "FT: England Out of Euro 2016". BBC Sport. 23 June 2016. Archived from the original on 29 June 2016. Retrieved 27 June 2016.
  66. ^ "England's defeat vs. Iceland at Euro 2016 will go down as one of their worst". ESPN FC. 27 June 2016. Archived from the original on 28 June 2016.
  67. ^ "Euro 2016: Roy Hodgson resigns after England lose to Iceland". BBC Sport. 28 June 2016. Archived from the original on 8 October 2016. Retrieved 28 September 2016.
  68. ^ Taylor, Louise (22 July 2016). "Sam Allardyce appointed England manager and says: 'It's time to deliver'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 6 October 2016. Retrieved 28 September 2016.
  69. ^ "Sam Allardyce: England manager leaves after one match in charge". BBC News Online. 27 September 2016. Archived from the original on 27 September 2016. Retrieved 27 September 2016.
  70. ^ "Gareth Southgate: Interim England manager wants future decided within a month". BBC Sport. 14 November 2016. Archived from the original on 22 November 2016. Retrieved 24 November 2016.
  71. ^ "Former defender signs four-year deal to lead Three Lions". The Football Association. 30 November 2016. Archived from the original on 29 October 2017. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  72. ^ FIFA.com. "2018 FIFA World Cup Russia - FIFA". FIFA. Archived from the original on 3 July 2018. Retrieved 8 July 2018.
  73. ^ "World Cup 2018: England beat Colombia 4–3 on penalties". BBC Sport. 3 July 2018. Archived from the original on 8 July 2018. Retrieved 8 July 2018.
  74. ^ "Sweden 0–2 England: Harry Maguire and Dele Alli head England into World Cup semis". Sky Sports. Archived from the original on 8 July 2018. Retrieved 8 July 2018.
  75. ^ "World Cup 2018: Croatia v England". BBC Sport. 11 July 2018. Archived from the original on 16 July 2018. Retrieved 12 July 2018.
  76. ^ "They've come home: England return after World Cup heroics". Sky News. Archived from the original on 15 July 2018. Retrieved 15 July 2018.
  77. ^ "Harry Kane wins World Cup 2018 Golden Boot with six goals in Russia". Evening Standard. 15 July 2018. Archived from the original on 14 August 2023. Retrieved 18 December 2022.
  78. ^ "Three Lions: One World Cup, 147 years and 1,000 games – the numbers behind England men's milestone". BBC Sport. 12 November 2019. Archived from the original on 13 November 2019. Retrieved 14 November 2019.
  79. ^ "England celebrate 1,000th game with seven-goal charge into Euro 2020 finals". The Guardian. 14 November 2019. Archived from the original on 14 November 2019. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  80. ^ McNulty, Phil. "Euro 2020 semi-final: England 2–1 Denmark". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 7 July 2021. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  81. ^ McNulty, Phil. "Euro 2020 semi-final: England 2–1 Denmark". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 7 July 2021. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  82. ^ "How Italy beat England to win Euro 2020". New York Times. 11 July 2021. Archived from the original on 12 July 2021. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  83. ^ Phil McNulty (21 November 2022). "England 6–2 Iran: Three Lions win World Cup opener". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 27 November 2022. Retrieved 19 December 2022.
  84. ^ Phil McNulty (29 November 2022). "World Cup 2022: Wales 0–3 England". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 7 March 2023. Retrieved 19 December 2022.
  85. ^ Scott Murray (4 December 2022). "England 3–0 Senegal: World Cup 2022, last 16 - as it happened". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 19 December 2022. Retrieved 19 December 2022.
  86. ^ Phil McNulty (10 December 2022). "Kane misses penalty as England exit World Cup". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 24 March 2023. Retrieved 19 December 2022.
  87. ^ "Kane matches Rooney's England scoring record of 53 goals". Reuters. 10 December 2022. Archived from the original on 20 July 2023. Retrieved 19 December 2022.
  88. ^ Miguel Delaney (10 December 2022). "'It's my fault': Harry Kane discusses penalty miss after England exit World Cup". The Independent. Archived from the original on 19 December 2022. Retrieved 19 December 2022.
  89. ^ "Jude Bellingham: England midfielder 'felt like Cristiano Ronaldo' after scoring bicycle kick against Slovakia". Sky Sports. 2 July 2024. Retrieved 11 July 2024.
  90. ^ Jacob Steinberg (6 July 2024). "England into Euro 2024 semi-finals after dramatic shootout win over Switzerland". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 July 2024.
  91. ^ Jacob Steinberg (10 July 2024). "Ollie Watkins' bolt from blue stuns Netherlands and sends England to final". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 July 2024.
  92. ^ "Kane curse continues': How Europe reacted to England's Euro 2024 final defeat". The Daily Telegraph. 15 July 2024. Retrieved 15 July 2024.
  93. ^ "Harry Kane: England striker shares Euro 2024 Golden Boot award with three goals". BBC Sport. 14 July 2024. Retrieved 15 July 2024.
  94. ^ Steinberg, Jacob (16 July 2024). "Gareth Southgate resigns as England manager after Euro 2024 final defeat". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 July 2024.
  95. ^ "England's Home Uniform 1949 to 1954". England Football Online. Archived from the original on 21 February 2020. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  96. ^ "England Player Kits". England Football Online. Archived from the original on 15 January 2008. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  97. ^ "England's Home Uniform 1954 to 1959". englandfootballonline.com. Archived from the original on 21 February 2020. Retrieved 12 February 2020.
  98. ^ "England 1946–1960". Historical Football Kits. Archived from the original on 5 January 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  99. ^ a b c "England 1960–1983". Historical Football Kits. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  100. ^ Steven Bloor (20 March 2013). "England's Umbro football kits – in pictures". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  101. ^ Sachin Nakrani (20 March 2013). "Farewell Umbro, welcome Nike – England's diamonds become a swoosh". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  102. ^ "FA announce new Nike deal". Archived from the original on 30 May 2019. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  103. ^ "New Nike deal makes England no.2 in World Football (but not on the pitch)". Archived from the original on 12 July 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  104. ^ "Football Association secures new £400m England kit deal". The Guardian. 13 December 2016. Archived from the original on 22 June 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  105. ^ Cartwright, Justin (14 September 2013). "Richard the Lionheart: battle addict who spent much of his life in France". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 7 April 2016. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  106. ^ a b "England 1872–1960". Historical Football Kits. Archived from the original on 9 March 2016. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  107. ^ Winter, Henry (3 March 2009). "England identity crisis ahead as FA rejig Three Lions". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 5 February 2016. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  108. ^ "How The FA found inspiration from the 1100s for its iconic Crest". UTalk Marketing. 12 March 2009. Archived from the original on 5 February 2016. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  109. ^ "England 1997 – 2010". Historical Football Kits. Archived from the original on 2 January 2016. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  110. ^ "England's Uniforms and Playing Kits". EnglandFootballOnline.com. Archived from the original on 15 January 2008. Retrieved 30 October 2014.
  111. ^ "Asks Premier to stop rodeo steer roping; British Society appeals 'in name of humanity' against contest of American cowboys". The New York Times. 17 June 1924. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  112. ^ Open University. "1924 British Empire Exhibition". Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  113. ^ "On this day, April 13, 1924, England played their first international at Wembley". The Irish News. 13 April 2018. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  114. ^ Alex Hess (29 May 2020). "Golden Goal: Dietmar Hamann for Germany v England (2000)". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  115. ^ "End of era for Wembley". BBC Sport. 7 February 2003. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  116. ^ Martyn Ziegler (23 July 2004). "Old Trafford to stage four home World Cup qualifiers". The Independent. Archived from the original on 20 September 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  117. ^ "England 1–1 Brazil". BBC Sport. 1 June 2007. Archived from the original on 25 September 2009. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  118. ^ "Stakeholders". Wembley Stadium. Archived from the original on 31 March 2021. Retrieved 16 September 2022.
  119. ^ Thom Gibbs (29 June 2021). "England's top 10 football rivalries — but where do Germany rank?". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 24 August 2023. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  120. ^ Ben Fisher (9 December 2022). "France's Hugo Lloris predicts 'big battle' with England in World Cup quarter-final". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 17 June 2023. Retrieved 16 July 2023.
  121. ^ Dafydd Pritchard (29 November 2022). "World Cup 2022: 'Anyone but England' - the game Wales do not want". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 14 August 2023. Retrieved 16 July 2023.
  122. ^ Miguel Delaney (12 November 2020). "What Ireland really feels about England, an 800-year rivalry of shades of grey, green and white". Independent. Archived from the original on 14 August 2023. Retrieved 16 July 2023.
  123. ^ "A history of fierce football rivalry". BBC News. 13 October 1999. Archived from the original on 15 September 2007. Retrieved 17 June 2021.
  124. ^ Duke, Greg (6 November 2008). "Top 10 international rivalries". CNN. Archived from the original on 20 February 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2010.
  125. ^ Donald Pollock (30 November 2022). "The day Scotland and England played the first football international". BBC News. Archived from the original on 24 August 2023. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  126. ^ "Scots relish Auld Enemy showdown". BBC News. 12 November 1999. Archived from the original on 2 June 2022. Retrieved 16 September 2007.
  127. ^ "You're watching the World Cup from Cumbria – the home of international football..." News and Star. 28 June 2010. Archived from the original on 6 September 2012. Retrieved 29 June 2010.
  128. ^ Jonathan Freedland (25 June 2021). "Rivalry? England v Germany is more like a tale of unrequited love". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 14 August 2023. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  129. ^ Parkinson, Gary (24 May 2024). "Euro 96, the complete history, part six: England's dream dies in Germany semi-final shootout". FourFourTwo. Retrieved 18 July 2024.
  130. ^ Simon Kuper (28 June 2021). "England's one-sided football rivalry with Germany loses its bite". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 14 August 2023. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  131. ^ Ronay, Barney (26 June 2021). "Germany, England's deepest rivals? In reality it's not a rivalry at all". The Guardian. Retrieved 18 July 2024.
  132. ^ "Diego Maradona & the Hand of God: The most infamous goal in World Cup history". Goal. Archived from the original on 22 June 2018. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  133. ^ a b Carlin, John (19 May 2002). "England v Argentina – A history". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 8 November 2020. Retrieved 22 June 2018.
  134. ^ a b "England national football team: record v Argentina". 11v11. Archived from the original on 14 August 2023. Retrieved 6 March 2023.
  135. ^ Dawnay, Oliver (6 June 2019). "Argentina legend Diego Maradona says 'Hand of God' goal against England was 'symbolic revenge' for the Falklands War". Talksport. Archived from the original on 21 February 2020. Retrieved 19 January 2020.
  136. ^ Gibson, Owen (11 October 2009). "Meltdown averted as England match draws online audience of 500,000". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on 8 August 2014. Retrieved 23 February 2010.
  137. ^ Association, The Football. "England matches to be broadcast by ITV and Sky Sports". The Football Association. Archived from the original on 24 December 2017. Retrieved 19 September 2018.
  138. ^ Dom Smith (30 April 2022). "Channel 4's England Deal Is a Victory for Those Who Too Often Lose". Englandfootball.org. Archived from the original on 30 April 2022. Retrieved 5 May 2022.
  139. ^ Sachin Nakrani (6 July 2021). "Team behind the team: meet Gareth Southgate's England backroom staff". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 28 September 2022. Retrieved 28 September 2022.
  140. ^ Nevin rejoins England staff Archived 31 August 2021 at the Wayback Machine England. Retrieved 6 September 2021
  141. ^ David Hytner (15 March 2023). "Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink joins England setup as Chris Powell steps down". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 24 May 2023. Retrieved 24 May 2023.
  142. ^ "England squad named for Euro 2024". englandfootball.com. The Football Association. 6 June 2024.
  143. ^ "Match Centre: Spain 2-1 England". englandfootball.com. The Football Association. 14 July 2024. Retrieved 14 July 2024.
  144. ^ "Most England Caps - EU-Football.info". eu-football.info. Archived from the original on 16 August 2022. Retrieved 9 June 2022.
  145. ^ Mamrud, Roberto. "England – Record International Players". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 2 April 2009. Retrieved 26 February 2021.
  146. ^ "Top England Goal Scorers". EU Football Info. Archived from the original on 1 March 2023. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  147. ^ "England goalkeepers: most clean sheets". englandfootballonline.com. Archived from the original on 26 August 2019. Retrieved 7 September 2019.
  148. ^ Tom White (18 December 2022). "Gareth Southgate: The data behind his England reign so far". The Independent. Archived from the original on 20 February 2023. Retrieved 20 February 2023.
  149. ^ Jeremy Armstrong & John Cross (10 February 2012). "EXCLUSIVE: Three Lions tamer needed: Fabio was facing player rebellion before he quit". The Mirror. Archived from the original on 20 February 2023. Retrieved 20 February 2023.
  150. ^ "How does Gareth Southgate's record compare to previous England managers?". 12 December 2022.
  151. ^ "The father of modern English football". PFA. 18 March 2013. Archived from the original on 20 February 2023. Retrieved 20 February 2023.
  152. ^ Jack Bell (20 February 2002). "Walter Winterbottom, 89, English Soccer Coach". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 20 February 2023. Retrieved 20 February 2023.
  153. ^ Michael Henderson (5 May 2012). "Roy of the reader: swapping novels with my friend Roy Hodgson". The Spectator. Archived from the original on 20 February 2023. Retrieved 20 February 2023.
  154. ^ David Hytner (15 November 2021). "England confirm World Cup 2022 spot with 10-goal demolition of San Marino". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 20 October 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  155. ^ "England v Hungary - a football match that started a revolution". BBC News. 23 November 2013. Archived from the original on 14 August 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  156. ^ Miguel Delaney (4 June 2022). "Lacklustre England slip to Nations League defeat in Hungary to end unbeaten streak". The Independent. Archived from the original on 14 June 2022. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  157. ^ "England match no.327 – USSR – 22 October 1958 – Match summary". England football online. Archived from the original on 22 September 2022. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  158. ^ "Opta facts around England's 1000th game". FA. 12 November 2019. Archived from the original on 12 November 2019. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  159. ^ Samuel Meade (7 July 2021). "Jordan Pickford breaks 55-year record moments before conceding". The Mirror. Archived from the original on 23 August 2021. Retrieved 15 June 2022.
  160. ^ Neil Duncanson (1 June 2020). "England's first World Cup adventure was a voyage of the damned". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 1 March 2023. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  161. ^ Charlotte Edmonds (17 November 2022). "Brazil, Germany Lead Countries With Most World Cup Appearances". NBC Los Angeles. Archived from the original on 16 February 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  162. ^ Aarish Ansari (18 December 2022). "Most FIFA World Cup wins: Brazil lead men's winners list; USA dominate women's roll of honour". Olympic Games. Archived from the original on 10 December 2022. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  163. ^ a b "1966 FIFA World Cup England". FIFA. Archived from the original on 12 April 2023. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  164. ^ "Italy 1990". BBC Sport. 17 April 2002. Archived from the original on 28 March 2023. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  165. ^ Phil McNulty (14 July 2018). "World Cup 2018: England finish fourth after Belgium defeat". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 30 June 2019. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  166. ^ Kieran King (11 December 2022). "England break unwanted record as Three Lions suffer World Cup heartache vs France". The Mirror. Archived from the original on 4 February 2023. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  167. ^ Martin Belam and James Ashford (9 June 2014). "England's 15 frustrating World Cup exits: The definitive ranking". The Mirror. Archived from the original on 4 February 2023. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  168. ^ "The greatest FIFA World Cup upsets". FIFA. Archived from the original on 4 February 2023. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  169. ^ a b "World Cup 2014: England knocked out of World Cup". BBC Sport. 20 June 2014. Archived from the original on 3 February 2023. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  170. ^ "Defeated England football team arrive home". BBC News. 29 June 2010. Archived from the original on 4 February 2023. Retrieved 4 February 2023.
  171. ^ "FIFA Council takes key decisions on FIFA World Cup editions in 2030 and 2034". FIFA. Archived from the original on 12 October 2023. Retrieved 14 October 2023.
  172. ^ a b c "England: all their EURO records and stats". UEFA.com. 11 July 2021. Archived from the original on 8 September 2023. Retrieved 8 September 2023.
  173. ^ a b "Italy vs England: UEFA EURO 2020 final match background, facts and stats". UEFA. 8 July 2021. Archived from the original on 16 February 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  174. ^ Nick Mulvenney (10 July 2018). "For 20 years, football wasn't coming home for England boss Southgate". Reuters. Archived from the original on 16 February 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  175. ^ "England in Minor Tournaments Taça das Nações Brazil". England Football Online. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  176. ^ "USA Bicentennial Cup 1976". RSSF. 5 February 2003. Archived from the original on 16 February 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  177. ^ a b c d e "Rous Cup". RSSF. Archived from the original on 19 February 2023. Retrieved 19 February 2023.
  178. ^ "Copa Ciudad de México 1985". RSSF. Archived from the original on 29 April 2023. Retrieved 19 February 2023.
  179. ^ "England in Minor Tournaments Ciudad de México Cup & Azteca 2000 United States". England Football Online. Archived from the original on 16 February 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  180. ^ a b "Challenge Cup 1991 (England)". RSSF. 20 October 2006. Archived from the original on 26 April 2023. Retrieved 19 February 2023.
  181. ^ "Umbro Cup 1995". RSSF. Archived from the original on 19 February 2023. Retrieved 19 February 2023.
  182. ^ a b Joe Brewin (3 June 2022). "Le Tournoi, 25 years on: When England last won a tournament". FourFourTwo. Archived from the original on 13 February 2023. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
  183. ^ "King Hassan II Tournament 1998". RSSF. Archived from the original on 25 June 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2023.
  184. ^ a b "FA Summer Tournament (2004) Manchester". RSSF. Archived from the original on 2 December 2019. Retrieved 16 February 2023.
[edit]